aefenglommung (aefenglommung) wrote,
aefenglommung
aefenglommung

Taking Your Show on the Road

There were just two of us in attendance in our breakout session tonight, but we constituted the first-ever-in-our-Council District Venturing Roundtable session. It's a good start.

Among the challenges we have had with Venturing in the fifteen years that the program's been on offer is, first, that Crews are few and far between, and second, too few have successful enough programs to sustain themselves. What has been missing has been the regular sharing of best practices that experienced leaders can share with less experienced leaders -- stuff that's not in the training manuals, deep wisdom earned at a price. That's what a Roundtable is. Cub Scout leaders meet with a Cub Scout Roundtable Commissioner who shows them what can be done, or who finds others to share what can be done. Boy Scout leaders meet with a Boy Scout Roundtable Commissioner who does the same thing. Venturing has not had this. But now, Wapehani District has enough Crews of sufficient stability (we think) to sustain a regular Roundtable session. I have volunteered to lead it.

Tonight's subject was, "Taking Your Show on the Road." Venturing lives and dies by its annual Superactivities, but there is no training program to teach you how to lead one. You either go in blind, or you learn from others who've done it before. I prepared an outline, which I share below. Some of the headings are a little quirky. You might not know immediately what I'm referring to, but that's okay. The overall gist is clear.

We're on our way! Come, join us!

Taking Your Show on the Road

The Old Catherd’s Ten Commandments for Pulling Off the Big Trip

1. LOOK FOR THE WOW FACTOR

Your destination/goal should have a certain cachet
Getting there is half the fun (tour attractions to break up the travel)

2. BE YOUR OWN OUTFITTER

Contain costs by cutting out the middleman
Use gear you are familiar with and don’t have to be responsible to another for
Train for the activity you’ll be doing – insist on participation in Shakedowns
Carry all the necessary certifications yourself
Travel light

3. DON’T BE IN A HURRY

The priorities in planning travel methods are cheap, fast, and convenient:
PICK TWO (if you’re lucky)

4. DO YOUR RESEARCH

Internet, atlases, guidebooks
Make reservations way in advance
Publish full itineraries with contact info, etc.
Anticipate difficulties, know what’s possible, esp. in terms of miles/day, rest stops, sleep
Submit Tour Plan EARLY

5. MAKE A BUDGET, SET COSTS WISELY

Individual costs are what they are, the trick is converting group costs to individual costs
Fudge on group size to allow for bounce
“Everything but your Coke and souvenir money”
Include t-shirts and meals out in the budget
New or special group gear (e.g., bear spray) goes in the budget; publish personal gear lists far enough ahead so that participants can obtain what they need (e.g., passports)

6. MAKE IT AFFORDABLE

Avoid sticker shock
Find scholarships
Use individual accounts in fund-raising
Roll over high adventure funds

7. WATCH OUT FOR TRAIN WRECKS

Adults are often anxious about time away; bracketing weekends can help with their limited vacation time
It’s not a failure if everyone can’t go
DO NOT CANCEL

8. AVOID FORCED UNIONS

Watch out for crowded campsites where you’ll have to deal with people with very different values from yours
Avoid having your group spread amongst other customers or vice versa

9. YOU ARE NOT THE LEADER, BUT YOU ARE STILL THE RESPONSIBLE ADULT

Every time you turn around in public places, count your group
Don’t let people straggle off
Keep tight control of group money, tickets, passports, health forms, etc.
Do not improvise the day’s plan – know where you’re going and keep to the schedule
Avoid meeting up with So-and-so’s Relative who can “show you around”
The youth leaders run the youth program, but adults are in charge of safety and logistics (and these are not up for debate)
The Advisor walks or paddles in the rear
Advisor is first one up, last one down
Third day on the trail is the most dangerous
Nine-tenths of all youth ministry problems are adult-generated
All adults watch out for the youth, but only the Advisor retains the role of Parent
Be consistent with discipline
Relationships = drama
The hardest part of the trip is when you start heading for home

10. START PLANNING THE NEXT SUPERACTIVITY RIGHT AWAY

The adult role is to “frame the decision”
Know how to backdate – some trips require 18-24 months of planning, some only six
Kids will often join just to do that Superactivity, so keep talking up your plans
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 0 comments